Avian Welfare Canada Inc.

Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada

Safe Indoor Plants

Note: Nothing is safe if toxic chemicals or insecticides have been sprayed on them. Before installing them in any cage, scrub all branches with a non-toxic disinfectant (such as diluted chlorine bleach) then rinse and dry well.


Acacia Aloe

African Violet

Baby's Tears

Bamboo

Begonia

Bougainvillea

Chickweed

Christmas Cactus

Cissus/Kangaroo Vine

Coffee

Coleus

Corn Plant

Crabapple

Dandelion

Dogwood

Donkey Tail

Dracaena Varieties

Ferns (asparagus, birdnest, boston, maidenhair)

Figs (creeping, rubber, fiddle leaf)

Figs (laurel leaf)

Gardenia

Grape Ivy

Hen's and Chickens

Herbs (ex oregano, rosemary, thyme)

Jade Plant

Kalanchoe

Marigold

Monkey Plant

Mother-in-Law's Tongue

Nasturtium

Natal Plum

Pepperomia

Petunia

Pittosporum

Prayer Plant

Purple Passion/Velvet Nettle

Schefflera (Umbrella) Sensitive Plant

Spider Plant

Swedish Ivy

Thistle

Wandering Jew

White Clover

Zebra Plant
 

Myths: Apple Seeds

Apple belongs to the Malus species. Apple SEEDS contain cyanogenic glycosides which release cyanide when ingested. It is not necessary to core apples before giving them to your birds. The small amount of cyanide that would be released from ingesting a few seeds is very unlikely to cause cyanide toxicity in birds.  If they were to ingest a large number, cyanide poisoning could occur. 


All other parts of the apple including the wood, is nontoxic. Apple branches are safe to use as natural wood perches.
 
All parts of plants/trees belonging to the Prunus species, with the EXCEPTION of the fruit itself, contain cyanogenic glycosides. This includes apricot, peach, nectarine, plum and cherry. The kernels inside these fruits should not be fed to birds, nor the wood used for perches.